Shovel Snow On Perennials For Extra Protection

We associate snow with cold, but there’s a reason Eskimos use it to build houses – snow’s a good insulator. Mother Nature insulates the ground from too-deep freezing by blanketing it with snow. The root system of plants can’t take cold temperatures the way the above-ground branches can. While the branches of adapted trees and shrubs…
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Back At Garden Blog After Pausing To Move House

I’m not very good at multi-tasking. During our summer/autumn house move I was able to keep up with our weekly Forum Communications garden columns Growing Together and Fielding Questions, but I didn’t produce our twice weekly AreaVoices gardening blog for the past several months. My days didn’t stretch far enough, and I missed our blog chats.…
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What Kind Of Gardener Steals Plants?

I’m so mad I could spit. I could also sit down and cry. Someone stole plants that were very important to us. Since spring we knew that our home of 30 years would be moved to a new location to make way for diking necessary to protect Fargo from flooding. In preparation for transitioning to a new…
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How To Tell If Homegrown Apples Are Ripe

You did it. You nurtured your backyard apple tree from a tender sapling to fruiting. All in the course of about 4 to 8 years, depending on which type you planted. How can you tell if the apples are at the proper stage of ripeness for picking? Apples turn red long before they’re ripe, so redness…
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What Happened To My Zucchini?

One year your zucchini crop is so overly productive that you’re leaving them on every neighborhood doorstep, ringing the doorbell and running. The next year your zucchini, or other summer squash, barely reach finger-length before the ends turn soft and rot. And you certainly don’t want to admit you’ve failed at zucchini-growing when everyone else is peddling wheelbarrows full of…
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